Monday, March 08, 2010

Life near a small town

Sister-in-law Rena called this evening.  Seems a local retired teacher who lives nearby came knocking at her door asking, "Does Arick live here?"  
Arick, by the way, is my oldest grandson.
"No," Rena said.  "He doesn't."  
"Well, he's been riding his horse in my yard, and the ground is so soft, he's leaving big, deep tracks.  I don't mind if he rides past my house, but I want him to stay out of my yard."  
"I've lived here two years," Rena told her, "and I've never seen Arick on a horse."  
"Well it looked like him; I could have sworn it was him."  
This woman was my grandson's teacher in the sixth grade.  He's twenty-five years old now.  
"You might want to talk to the people next door," Rena said.  "Those kids have been riding horses a lot lately."  
"You mean Marvin's children?"  
"Yes, that would be the ones you need to contact," Rena told her.  
I got a big laugh out of this because in the first place, Arick hasn't lived here for two years.  And he works six days a week.  And he hasn't been on a horse for over two years.  
People tend to get labeled in small towns.  People even tend to get sixth-grade misbehaviors pinned on them after they're adults.  It's hard to outlive your past.

9 comments:

Paula said...

Yep thats small town mentality but on the other hand if Arick needed help they would probably all be there too. Guess it all evens out and gives something to laugh about. Bet Arick was surprised to hear where he was when he thought he was somewhere else.lol

madcobug said...

That woman was really jumping to conclusions. Helen

Sonya said...

Yeah, and people have images in their head and they forget people age. I often think I see people I know and then I remember "no they would have gray hair now" lol Anyway, glad Arick is not in trouble with the teacher. lol

Midlife Mom said...

I came from a town of about 400 people so I know just what you are talking about! ha! Poor Arick, blamed for something he didn't do! I hope he gets a chuckle out of it though.

anjelblaze said...

I know the feeling, being the biggest kid in town, got blamed for everything. But when chips were down folks came to the aid of those that needed help.

Muhd Imran said...

Mindsets are hardest to change... mend.

Tipper said...

Cute post! I agree with the small town mentality-and then there's the whole time passes so quickly we sometimes think of someone as still being a little boy-when they are a big fully grown man : )

Sayit-baldys said...

MY GRADESCHOOL DAYS WERE IN A SMALL TOWN.
FOND MEMORIES OF SOME OF THE TEACHERS. 'MISS PEARL', FAVORITE. LADY TEACHERS WERE ADDRESSED AS 'MISS', EVEN THO MARRIED.
MISS PEARL HAD LOVE AND RESPECT FROM THE WORST BEHAVED BOYS.
SEVERAL FAMILIES IN THE TOWN WERE INTER-RELATED, SO IT WAS NECESSARY TO THINK BEFORE CRITICIZING.

MY SMALL HOMETOWN WAS CHOUTEAU OKLAHOMA,EASTERN OKLAHOMA NEAR THE NEOSHO RIVER. DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION.
DIRT STREETS, TWO BLACKSMITH SHOPS, ONE SHOESHOP THAT KEPT THE OWNER BUSY, EVEN THO MOST CHILDREN WENT BAREFOOT EXCEPT WINTERTIME.
NO ELECTRICITY OR INDOOR PLUMBING.
FOUR CHURCHES, A 'FILLING'STATION AND TWO GROCERY STORES.
A SIGN AT THE EDGE OF TOWN SAID, THREE HUNDRED GOOD NEIGHBORS AND ONE GROUCH. sam

Anonymous said...

Hello Donna:

I have been reading and enjoying your blog for 4 or more years and look forward to a new entry or two every day. I'm curious if you could elaborate on the eating habits daily that you have. I noticed that you've lost 10 lbs. Great news. Perhaps you could preface your blog with what you've eaten and exercise for the day before. I'd like to follow your example.

Thank you,

Tina