Sunday, March 21, 2010

If only I had taken pictures

Last fall Cliff offered to plow my garden, and I turned him down; I think I had some harebrained experiment in mind that would not have required plowing.  After letting the idea hibernate all winter, I decided it wasn't a good one and told Cliff I wanted my garden plowed after all.  
When the spring thaw came, the garden area turned into a quagmire for a couple of weeks.  Then we started getting rain every other day.  Cliff was willing to plow, but the ground needed to dry out a lot.  I'd watch the forecast, knowing that all we needed was four or five days with no rain: our sandy soil drains really fast.  But the rains kept coming.  Thursday, after getting home from our motorcycle ride, Cliff suggested it might be possible to plow; the only way to find out was to hook up to a plow and try it.  
He took the little John Deere (I used to call it the Jap Deere because it was made in Japan, but some people felt that was a racist expression) and hooked up to a plow the size of Texas.  Oh yes, he had high hopes.  He managed to make it about fifteen feet before the little tractor spun out.  In its defense, it doesn't have the proper tires for such work; turf tires were never meant to bite into the dirt.  If I'd had my camera, you would have loved the video of this scene, which was reminiscent of "the little engine that could".  But that's rather like a fisherman telling about the one that got away, isn't it?    
I helped Cliff unhook the plow, which he left in the garden while he went after a bigger tractor:  Since the big Oliver is in an eternal state of being restored, he chose our brother-in-law's Mahindra, which was definitely up to the task.  
A big tractor in a small garden is pretty tricky, especially if there are trees and a fence at one end and a strawberry bed at the other.  I stood by, letting Cliff know when to raise the plow each time he approached the strawberries, and in less than ten minutes, the plowing was done.  
When we first went out to do the plowing, I had suggested Cliff make the garden six feet wider.  As I stood there watching the dirt turn over, though, I remembered how much it taxed my knees last year to try and keep up with the gardening and told him to forget the expansion.  
The garden is presently covered by six inches of snow.  But at least when the weather is right, I can get out there with the tiller.  Cliff's job is done.

7 comments:

I'm mostly known as 'MA' said...

Snow??? We got colder here but thankfully none of that white stuff.

Muhd Imran said...

That is one big garden! Here, a garden is about 10 paces' length... and that is for the rich people.

The Guy Who Writes This said...

We have moved onto raised beds that are 6 feet by 4 feet. They never get walked in and it's really easy to maintain and add compost. We let the chicken clean them out in the fall.

madcobug said...

Glad that he got it plowed before the snowfall. I can't believe they are calling for some snow here tonight. Seeing is believing LOL. Helen

Wil said...

We used to call that snowfall on turned ground a "poor man's fertilizer" as it tends to sweep all available nitrogen from the air with it as it falls. Given the price of fertilizer, we needed any help we could get...

Milly said...

My lord! You have a field -- not a garden (cries the city girl with amazement!). We hire a lawn man to mow and rake -- and yes, shovel. Imagine having a tractor -- more than ONE tractor! I simply can't fathom what you plan to plant and how you can keep up with what you plant. But, boy! am I impressed! I think a great lawn is a square of concrete painted green. However, a fresh strawberries? And I bet asparagus, too. How delicious! Keep the pictures coming, please.

Lori said...

Well at least you've got it plowed now. I would have liked to have seen the "little tractor that couldn't". Hope your snow is melting by now.