Wednesday, August 18, 2010

What's the worst thing that could happen?

Now that we've started discussing Cliff's retirement, he is really getting excited about it.
He's also getting nervous.
"With this economy," he said yesterday, "if worse comes to worse and we have to sell the place, will it bring enough money to do any good?"
Well, I'm pretty sure, even in this economy, that the place would bring enough to pay off the mortgage.  We might not be left with much, but we'd survive.
It scary situations, I always ask myself, "What's the worse thing that could happen?"  
(Warning:  This question does not work when the scary situation involves illness; don't even go there.)  
This is my way of coming up with a "Plan B" in case "Plan A" doesn't work out.
So last night while Cliff was at work, I decided to take an imaginary journey to the worst-case scenario.
Let's say we can no longer make ends meet on social security and we are forced to sell this place for the amount owed against it.  Where will we go from here?
Of course we could rent a small house in a nearby town.  But poor Cliff would be lost without his tractors; he's not a town guy. What about that?
Wait a minute... he has a brother not so far away with a farm twice the size of this place, and lots of sheds.  I'll bet he'd let Cliff park a tractor or two there.  And I know for a fact he'd let Cliff plow and mow to his heart's content.
And in case that didn't work out, I happen to know about a vacant farmhouse whose owners would love to have us as tenants, and the rent would be pretty darned cheap.  Again, there would be room for Cliff to plow and mow and play with tractors to his heart's content.
I'm not scared.





You don't have to worry
And don't you be afraid
Joy comes in the morning
Troubles they don't last always
For there's a friend named Jesus
Who will wipe your tears away
And if your heart is broken
Just lift your hands and say

CHORUS
Oh! I know that I can make it
I know that I can stand
No matter what may come my way
My life is in your hands

You don't have to worry
And don't you be afraid
Joy comes in the morning
Troubles they don't last always
For there's a friend named Jesus
Who will wipe your tears away
And if your heart is broken
Just lift your hands and say

12 comments:

Remo said...

I would hope you can always have a little room to raise food and grow stuff. It really saves on the cost of living. Life is full of options when you're willing to consider the possibilities.

Donna said...

Remo, either of my options would give us a space for gardening. Cliff's brother's place, or the other one I mentioned. And of course, the small house we might rent near Cliff's brother might have garden space of its own, who knows?

I'm mostly known as 'MA' said...

I'm sure you and Cliff will enjoy retirement to the fullest. I know I do. It doesn't take a lot of money to enjoy each day as it comes. I know as I've been doing it now since April and I absolutely love it! I still find myself saying this is just too good to be true...

Anonymous said...

Have you tried living on just the SS for a month or two to see how it would go?

sam

Donna said...

Sam, we're taking care of a couple of outstanding bills; then we are going to try it, yes, except that Cliff will still carry his generous allowance. I hate to take that away from him; the time will come, soon enough.

Sister--Three said...

Donna, I read your Momma's story and loved it so much. I want to thank you for sharing it.

I guess when we think we are poor we should stop and ponder what our parents and grandparents endured.

My life is rich and I am thankful for it. Praise the Lord for all his blessings.

Betty in Arkansas

Anonymous said...

Hi...I have read your blog for awhile but have never commented before.
Have you looked into reverse mortgages? From what I have read it is a way for retired people (over 62) to stay in their homes as long as they choose. You are paid an amount monthly while you live there. If you sell or pass away the money you have received has to be paid back (usually by the sale of the house).
Of course...there could be huge negatives with this...just thought I would mention it since it seems as if you would really be happier staying there.

Good luck!!

Tracie

Donna said...

Tracie, the only mortgage we now have on our home is a home equity loan; I think the reverse mortgage would work if you had your home mostly paid off, but we recently borrowed $100,000 so we could move out to the pasture. So I doubt reverse mortgage would work for us.

Adirondackcountrygal said...

I have terrible bills and hope to at least pay the landlord for a year in advance soon. Maybe we can actually get ahead or perhaps I can even do what I've dreamed and have a horse. Have to board it however. By the way, do you have a calf yet?

FrankandMary said...

You could move in with Rachel.

Yeah, I'm kidding ....Mary

Donna said...

Ahem.

Milly said...

I think you have pretty well covered the worst case scenes and realized that you will and can survive, no matter what happens. I think this may be the motto of our generation -- we will survive (let's all break into song now . . .). You know how to save, you know how to grow food, you have your freeze full. There may not be cavier and champaigne, but the greens are hearty and the stew filling. M.